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Do delta machines still print in flat layers/slices?

Posted by richard the boffin 
Do delta machines still print in flat layers/slices?
March 25, 2018 10:41AM
I was wondering if a delta machine still printed in flat slices or if it can print layers in any orientation and with changes in that orientation?
Re: Do delta machines still print in flat layers/slices?
March 25, 2018 01:19PM
No the delta kinematic (as implemented typically in 3D printing) is a mechanism using parallel rods to position an effector and attached tool in a defined 3d dimensional volume. The way it prints is exactly the same as a cartesian machine. However the print head, rods and carriages are optimised to be lightweight. The moving mass is therefore low compared with other schemes which enables considerably faster non printing moves, and somewhat faster printing moves. Movement in the z direction is inherently faster than most/all other schemes although this is rarely advantageous to actual printing, but does make a delta a great pick and place system.

On the lighter side they look cool, they are mechanically simple in concept to build, but the build needs to be precise.

I have for a while been wondering if there would be a way to print an object from two different orientations but have no firm idea of how that would actually work.

Edited 1 time(s). Last edit at 03/25/2018 01:20PM by DjDemonD.


Simon.

[www.precisionpiezo.co.uk] Accurate, repeatable, versatile z-probe plus piezo discs, endstop cables, pt100, 50w heaters. PT1000 cartridge sensors plug straight into duet boards and others.
Published:Inventions
Re: Do delta machines still print in flat layers/slices?
March 25, 2018 05:25PM
Quote
DjDemonD
No the delta kinematic (as implemented typically in 3D printing) is a mechanism using parallel rods to position an effector and attached tool in a defined 3d dimensional volume. The way it prints is exactly the same as a cartesian machine. However the print head, rods and carriages are optimised to be lightweight. The moving mass is therefore low compared with other schemes which enables considerably faster non printing moves, and somewhat faster printing moves. Movement in the z direction is inherently faster than most/all other schemes although this is rarely advantageous to actual printing, but does make a delta a great pick and place system.

On the lighter side they look cool, they are mechanically simple in concept to build, but the build needs to be precise.

I have for a while been wondering if there would be a way to print an object from two different orientations but have no firm idea of how that would actually work.

I was thinking about the issues with flat slice printing (supports, overhangs etc), If the 'bed' was more of a small point, mounted on a stepper motor at right angles to the print head, could the print be built up that way?

Think of printing a cube starting from a corner...
Re: Do delta machines still print in flat layers/slices?
March 26, 2018 09:24AM
I've been thinking this way myself but haven't had the time to really fathom out how this would work.


Simon.

[www.precisionpiezo.co.uk] Accurate, repeatable, versatile z-probe plus piezo discs, endstop cables, pt100, 50w heaters. PT1000 cartridge sensors plug straight into duet boards and others.
Published:Inventions
Re: Do delta machines still print in flat layers/slices?
April 11, 2018 01:31PM
How about using a delta to print @ 45 degrees like the belt printers? Could be an interesting way of removing the need for support
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