Franklin

From RepRap
Jump to: navigation, search
Crystal Clear action run.png
Franklin

Release status: Tested

Franklin.png
Description
A RepRap driver.
License
GNU AFFERO v3
Author
Contributors
Based-on
Categories
software
CAD Models
none
External Link


Franklin is a RepRap driver developed by Bas Wijnen. This is software for controlling a RepRap 3-D printer among many other devices - originally tested at the Michigan Tech Open Sustainable Technology Lab (MOST).

Download

Latest version: https://github.com/mtu-most/franklin Please see the wiki on github for up to date information.

Paper with Full Description

  • Wijnen, B., Anzalone, G. C., Haselhuhn, A.S., Sanders, P.G., Pearce, J. M. Free and Open-source Control Software for 3-D Motion and Processing. Journal of Open Research Software, 4: e2, DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.5334/jors.78 free access

Instructions

Please see the wiki on github for up to date information.

  • Franklin was tested successfully on the following RepRap devices: Mendel RepRap, Delta RepRap, OS laser welder, PCB micromill, and the open source metal 3-D printer.

Abstract

RepRap 3-D printers and their derivatives using conventional firmware are limited by: 1) requiring technical knowledge, 2) poor resilience with unreliable hardware, and 3) poor integration in complicated systems. In this paper, a new control system called Franklin, for CNC machines in general and 3-D printers specifically, is presented that enables web-based three dimensional control of additive, subtractive and analytical tools from any Internet connected device. Franklin can be set up and controlled entirely from a web interface; it uses a custom protocol which allows it to continue printing when the connection is temporarily lost, and allows communication with scripts.

Keywords

3-D printing, additive manufacturing, distributed manufacturing, firmware, free and open source software, FOSS, open-source, open-source electronics, open-source hardware, personal fabrication, printing, RepRap, rapid prototyping

Naming

The software earned its name from a compelling section of Benjamin Franklin’s autobiography, which explained why he refused patents on his inventions like a more efficient stove: “That, as we enjoy great advantages from the inventions of others, we should be glad of an opportunity to serve others by any invention of ours; and this we should do freely and generously.” [1]