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An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500

Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
March 26, 2018 12:06PM
Hi all,

I'm on the same page, picked up a very little used cubepro duo and eight sealed pla and abs cartridges for £355.

Very impressed with the mechanics, less so with everything else....even prints are not too good and you can't really tinker.

So i will probably remove all the existing controls and replace.

I have an airwolf axiom that i have modified and that now prints like a champ. I fitted a touchscreen to replace the horrible vkiki2

And so I may just fit a rambo board and be done with it,..i don't think it will ever be fast enough to require more than an 8 bit controller...any thoughts?

best regards and stay tuned!
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
March 27, 2018 11:32AM
Looks like a steal at that price. Used one I just looked up was $800US.

Looks like a CoreXY ? I'd just toss a ramps in there (cause thats what I have), recode the firmware and try it.

What kind of extruder setup is in there?
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
March 28, 2018 08:42AM
Don't think I've done too badly!

I'll probably go with rambo board, i don't think it needs 32bit

it's not corexy, the extruders are similar to bog standard mk10.
I might even change the hotends to e3dv6..

...........
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
April 15, 2018 05:49PM
Hi Guys,

Found a cheap duet wifi on fleabay...

fitted and kinda working.

[photos.google.com]

Just need to sort out a hmi, I have a nextion 2.4" that I'm hoping to make a copy of the cubepro screens on...

wish me luck!

Ian
Attachments:
open | download - rsz_img_20180415_213949.jpg (581.3 KB)
open | download - rsz_img_20180415_214143.jpg (582 KB)
open | download - rsz_img_20180415_214151.jpg (581.6 KB)
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
April 15, 2018 07:16PM
That looks promising! I have a duet too.. Min d sharing a fw copy? Everything else stock?
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
April 21, 2018 01:25PM
of course I don't mind...next time I'm working on it i'll copy it for you
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
April 25, 2018 02:35PM
here you are,

seems to work ok...

cheers,
Ian
Attachments:
open | download - bed.g (339 bytes)
open | download - config.g (3.5 KB)
open | download - homeall.g (1.3 KB)
open | download - homex.g (517 bytes)
open | download - homey.g (512 bytes)
open | download - homez.g (274 bytes)
open | download - pause.g (383 bytes)
open | download - resume.g (386 bytes)
open | download - resurrect.g (393 bytes)
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
April 25, 2018 02:37PM
and more...
Attachments:
open | download - sleep.g (161 bytes)
open | download - stop.g (193 bytes)
open | download - tfree0.g (148 bytes)
open | download - tfree1.g (148 bytes)
open | download - tpost0.g (208 bytes)
open | download - tpost1.g (208 bytes)
open | download - tpre0.g (152 bytes)
open | download - tpre1.g (152 bytes)
open | download - iap4e.bin (57.6 KB)
open | download - iap.bin (51.3 KB)
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
April 25, 2018 02:39PM
can't attach DuetWebControl.bin


you have all the rest.
Attachments:
open | download - config.json (3 KB)
open | download - Duet2CombinedFirmware.bin (371.6 KB)
open | download - DuetWiFiFirmware.bin (371.6 KB)
open | download - DuetWiFiServer.bin (289.9 KB)
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
April 26, 2018 03:37AM
Perhaps making a .ZIP of everything and hosting it in MEGA or similar cloud service?
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
May 06, 2018 03:09PM
Hi Dancook,
I've recently gotten my hands on a 3D Printer (Cube 3) and as you know it can only print ABS and PLA. I'd really like to print TPU and was wondering if you would help me understand (in detail) what I would need to do this? I'm very new with 3D printers, so as detailed as possible would be greatly appreciated!
Thanks
meafrd@outlook.com
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
November 06, 2018 07:06PM
Hey Dorris, I have the same setup, printer and diet Wi-Fi. I haven’t messed with mine in awhile but actually just got the go ahead to play with it some more in the last couple days. So I’ll have to refresh my memory on the codes etc. I remember I had all the coding done on it except for a few. I know I needed to get the bin swipe codes done for the extruder before the print started, did you get that? I’ll look thru your codes to see. Also did you set up the enclosure heater? I never set mine up, but probably will.

Edit, just remembered that the waste bin swipe procedure would be in the slicer. For instance I was using simplified and it would be there that it would need to be added

Also when I got mine it was in pieces. In one of your picture there’s a metal shield in the back right corner. I’ve got that shield but don’t know what it’s purpose is for. What’s underneath it? Mine doesn’t have anything there

Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 11/06/2018 07:23PM by advancedrescue.
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
December 03, 2018 10:11AM
I am new to 3D printing and just scored a pair of Duo's for $250CAD. One works fine and has been modded by previous owner to take std 1.75 filament. The other has a problem with electronics. My intention is to Reprap this one and use the other to build any parts i need for it.
I decided not to go the 32bit route as, at the moment I feel it would be overkill. I have on order a Rumba clone (Tango v1) with smart controller lcd and have prepped a Pi B+ I had laying around (from a Brewpi project) with Octopi and Octoprint.

I have stripped out the electronics and am raring to go. I have a few decisions I need to make before I order some more parts and am seeking advice from you guys who have been there before.

First issue is 12v or 24v power supply.
I will almost certainly add a heated bed in the future. I am also planning to replace the hot ends (more later).
The Tango will take 12-24v but from what I can see from the schematics the hot bed and the first 2 extruders will run off the input voltage and the 3rd extruder and 2 fan o/ps can be selected 12 or input voltage. I don't have a 3rd extruder so that can be used for something else if necessary (if it can be configured to do so in marlin).
Are there any issues with stepper motor voltage?
I understand benefits in using 24v in terms of lower current flow and how it affects wire gauge choice but are there any other considerations?
If I were to keep the stock hot ends I assume I would need to go 12v?
As for hot ends, general concensus I get from multiple read throughs of this thread (and many more) is that the stock hot ends are not that great. I would like to use the stock extruder so is the right way to go to buy the v6 hot end with the screw in bowden fitting on the end and turn that down to 10mm to fit the existing extruder?
Will this make the length correct? Do I need to enlarge the hole to make clearance for heatsink? Are there any new approaches to this problem?
Should I buy the hot end with fan attached or use the existing carriage mounted fans?
I'm a bit confused with choice for hot ends regarding ptfe or full metal and also the heat breaks, where do they come in and why?
There are also all the options for nozzle size what size is best for gen purpose?
There are a bewildering array of available options online so it's great to have this forum available to help save making multiple wrong purchases.
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
December 03, 2018 02:28PM
I never thought about buying a used printer online to retrofit - it's a neat idea i might have to have a look on ebay..... look what you've done now!
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
December 03, 2018 02:39PM
Quote

First issue is 12v or 24v power supply.

There is some advice about the merits of 24V vs 12V at
[duet3d.dozuki.com].


Delta printer calibration calculator, mini IR Z probe, and colour touch screen control panel: [escher3d.com]

Large delta printer, and other 3D printer blog postings: [miscsolutions.wordpress.com]

Disclosure: I have a financial interest in sales of the Panel Due, Mini IR height sensor, and Duet WiFi/Duet Ethernet.
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
December 03, 2018 03:17PM
Quote
jimboh3
I am new to 3D printing and just scored a pair of Duo's for $250CAD. One works fine and has been modded by previous owner to take std 1.75 filament. The other has a problem with electronics. My intention is to Reprap this one and use the other to build any parts i need for it.
I decided not to go the 32bit route as, at the moment I feel it would be overkill. I have on order a Rumba clone (Tango v1) with smart controller lcd and have prepped a Pi B+ I had laying around (from a Brewpi project) with Octopi and Octoprint.

Lots of options ahead, including simply using the printer that you have and the other as spare parts.

Be aware that going down the road of building or even modding a printer can suck the money straight from your bank account, and even not making any "wrong purchases" you can end up spending a fair chunk of change. In the end, you really SHOULD end up with something that's better than any kind of $500 kit that you're going to find, but you may well end up spending more than $500 when you add up the pieces, too. Having something that can bootstrap the process, allowing you to print your pwn parts is a good place to start, and often where people start from with the $300-$500 kit. (Or at least that's where I started from.) My kit printer is still running, though I haven't powered it on for a while.

Power supply: 24V is vastly superior, and will give you more options for kinematics, and various drive systems, as well as readily avaialble heated beds, before you get to mains-powered ceramic heaters bonded to tool plate. On the other hand, 12V ATX power supplies are available cheap. Even cheaper if you have an old PC that you were about to junk.

Heater cartridges are cheap, and can usually be replaced for 12V or 24V operation, if you have the wrong one. NBD. changing out the heater in the stock hot ends is likely to be relatively easy.

There are all kinds of options for replacing the hot ends, too,a nd if you are going to go that route, then the voltage isn't an issue, as you can get almost any of them in whatever configuration you want. The E3D V6 is a nice hot-end, and there are lots of options for mounting them.

Most people seem to have settled on 0.4mm for nozzle size. This gives a fair amount of detail in the finished prints, and seems to give a reasonable overall print speed. For the E3Dv6 hot ends, you can go anywhere from 0.2 to 0.6. For larger, the Volcano style heat blocks take over. Personally, I'm looking at being able to swap between a "regular" e3Dv6 with a 0.4mm nozzle and a Volcano block with a 0.8mm nozzle for more rapid prototyping.
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
December 03, 2018 04:09PM
Thanks guys for the swift response and good reading including the link. I should have mentioned that I am also a tinkerer. Get a ton of pleasure out of building this kind of stuff.
I am familiar with using SSRs as I am on my third incarnation of electric brewery build and PWM 4.5kw elements.
If I went for an AC heat bed I assume I would need an SSR for tighter heat control using PWM? Or do you just use a relay an no PWM?
My fermentation chamber uses a 100W ceramic heater and I just use a 10A relay for that but I am maintaining much lower and looser temps.

I do have a 10A 12v PSU from a security camera system but I will purchase a 24v if that makes more sense.
Because I have 2 Y steppers I ordered DR8825 drivers because i thought, maybe mistakenly, that I would need more current to drive two and the DR8825 appeared to be higher rated. I have read that I can drive them in serial or parallel but I have also read I can use the spare extruder driver on the rumba for the second stepper motor. Did I misunderstand and was it a mistake getting the DR8825s? I have read of issues, but also that they are easily sorted.
The place I am ordering from has option of DR8825, A4988 or TM2100(extra $30). they havent shipped yet so possibly still time to change the order.

Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 12/03/2018 04:20PM by jimboh3.
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
December 05, 2018 11:23AM
Hey guys! It's been a while since I've looked through this thread... my Cubex is still printing away... I've had some issues lately with Z-banding, and had to come back here to figure out what size lead screw these things use. I've been using 0.2mm layer heights for my prints, and it turns out that's going to cause a layer issue every 7-8 mm... The Prusa layer calculator says that 0.195 and 0.210 should work without causing the error, so I'll give it a go tonight.
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
December 05, 2018 12:01PM
Yeah it's an imperial thread, so there will always be rounding errors. I changed the steps per mm to an even 1000 then stretched the model to correct the size for a while, but it could still look crappy. Recently changed the drive to one of the 8mm per turn shaft motors like in the i3's, get perfect z layers now. Having the shaft as part of the motor also reduced the slop/play in the bed significantly.

The print head heaters do need 15V to operate properly. I tried a Cubepro head which I am guessing runs at 24V as the higher resistance heater wire meant the Duet would think there was a fault as it couldn't heat it fast enough.

One thing I did that improved the print quality to a point where it wasn't worth changing, was to put a piece of 1200 grit wet and dry paper on the bed and run the hotend over it a circular motion to get the bottom flat, they are kind of rounded as standard and don't push the layers down properly.

Edited 2 time(s). Last edit at 12/05/2018 12:05PM by Firefox3D.
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
December 05, 2018 12:36PM
"One thing I did that improved the print quality to a point where it wasn't worth changing, was to put a piece of 1200 grit wet and dry paper on the bed and run the hotend over it a circular motion to get the bottom flat, they are kind of rounded as standard and don't push the layers down properly."

PURE GENIUS!!!
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
December 05, 2018 03:44PM
Quote
Firefox3D
The print head heaters do need 15V to operate properly. I tried a Cubepro head which I am guessing runs at 24V as the higher resistance heater wire meant the Duet would think there was a fault as it couldn't heat it fast enough.

Did you run heater tuning? On the Duet, heater tuning not only allows good PID parameters to be calculated, it also calibrates what the firmware considers normal behaviour for the heater, which affects the heater fault detection.


Delta printer calibration calculator, mini IR Z probe, and colour touch screen control panel: [escher3d.com]

Large delta printer, and other 3D printer blog postings: [miscsolutions.wordpress.com]

Disclosure: I have a financial interest in sales of the Panel Due, Mini IR height sensor, and Duet WiFi/Duet Ethernet.
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
December 07, 2018 10:09AM
Thanks, Firefox3D... I literally beat my head up against the wall trying to figure out how to print without the rounding errors... I ordered one of the stepper/lead screw combos as you mentioned... it'll be here tomorrow, so hopefully I'll get perfect prints tomorrow. Did you get a NEMA 17 version? I didn't see any NEMA 23 versions.
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
December 07, 2018 06:07PM
Quote
jimboh3
I am new to 3D printing and just scored a pair of Duo's for $250CAD.

.

Nice find! Where did you find them?
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
December 07, 2018 07:01PM
I am in NS Canada and saw an ad on Kijiji. Had to drive 3hr round trip to get them but thought it worthwhile.
Had a little free filament with it so was able to test print on the working one and now am awaiting new spools and all the electronics so I can start resurrecting the second one.
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
December 07, 2018 08:26PM
Quote
Dancook
Thanks, Firefox3D... I literally beat my head up against the wall trying to figure out how to print without the rounding errors... I ordered one of the stepper/lead screw combos as you mentioned... it'll be here tomorrow, so hopefully I'll get perfect prints tomorrow. Did you get a NEMA 17 version? I didn't see any NEMA 23 versions.

You can get custom Nema 23's but they were pretty expensive, I "borrowed" mine from my converted Ormerod 2, just made an adaptor plate out of aluminium to fit it. One thing that I really should have mentioned is the holding torque of the motor when powered off may not be able to hold the bed up. Mine has another bed support (from a spare cubepro) crosslinked with the original and a 5mm aluminium plate for the heated bed that adds considerably more weight, so yours may well be ok. I have to move my bed to the maximum, in my case 228mm when powering down, then when turning back on I have a G92 Z228 command in the startup file.
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
December 07, 2018 08:32PM
Quote
dc42
Quote
Firefox3D
The print head heaters do need 15V to operate properly. I tried a Cubepro head which I am guessing runs at 24V as the higher resistance heater wire meant the Duet would think there was a fault as it couldn't heat it fast enough.

Did you run heater tuning? On the Duet, heater tuning not only allows good PID parameters to be calculated, it also calibrates what the firmware considers normal behaviour for the heater, which affects the heater fault detection.

I was trying the other head as I thought I had a fault with the original one, turned out just to be a half broken wire near one of the crimps. The resistance of the Cubex heater is 5 ohms which seems to be in the normal range, the Cubepro head is nearer to 10 ohms, is this within tunable range?
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
December 08, 2018 02:58AM
Quote
Firefox3D
I was trying the other head as I thought I had a fault with the original one, turned out just to be a half broken wire near one of the crimps. The resistance of the Cubex heater is 5 ohms which seems to be in the normal range, the Cubepro head is nearer to 10 ohms, is this within tunable range?

If you were running a 10 ohm heater at 12V then it would probably not be able to maintain printing temperature. At 15V it would probably be OK, at least for the temperatures needed to print PLA.


Delta printer calibration calculator, mini IR Z probe, and colour touch screen control panel: [escher3d.com]

Large delta printer, and other 3D printer blog postings: [miscsolutions.wordpress.com]

Disclosure: I have a financial interest in sales of the Panel Due, Mini IR height sensor, and Duet WiFi/Duet Ethernet.
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
December 08, 2018 09:45AM
Quote
dc42
Quote
Firefox3D
I was trying the other head as I thought I had a fault with the original one, turned out just to be a half broken wire near one of the crimps. The resistance of the Cubex heater is 5 ohms which seems to be in the normal range, the Cubepro head is nearer to 10 ohms, is this within tunable range?

If you were running a 10 ohm heater at 12V then it would probably not be able to maintain printing temperature. At 15V it would probably be OK, at least for the temperatures needed to print PLA.

That makes sense, I really only print ABS on the printer. It took about twice as long but could get to around 220 degrees ok, but took too long to get to 240 so the firmware assumed an error.
Re: An alternative to buying a bad kit for $300-500
December 18, 2018 01:34AM
Quick question - does anyone know what voltage the led enclosure and hotend lights on a cube PRO run on? They have a resistor wired in to them, I have tried the. On 12v but they seem too bright-I’m concerned they will be cooked if I run them at this voltage.
I’m . In the process of installing a panel duet to a cube pro trio
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